Gaming

Succession episode 9’s #MeToo second supplied precise hope for humanity



Succession’s plotlines routinely rip from the headlines, then maintain digging. A part of the enchantment of the present is that it provides texture and shade to one thing we’ve all the time identified deep down: the wealthy solely care about getting richer.
This week’s episode, nonetheless, takes essentially the most optimistic stance the present has but, implying that a congressional listening to that uncovered gross misconduct might have repercussions for the highly effective folks concerned.
[Ed. note: This post contains spoilers for Succession season 2, episode 9, “DC”]
Whether or not or not the Roys will lose management of their firm because of “10 dangerous minutes on digicam” stays to be seen, however the truth that it’s an actual chance appears hopeful to the purpose of fantasy.
“DC” was actually exhausting to look at for lots of causes. One, after all, is that teary-eyed Matthew Macfadyen is a really devastating sight. And as obnoxious as Roman is, I nonetheless don’t suppose he deserves to die in a Turkish lodge. But additionally, I’m simply exhausted. It seems like each week for the previous two years there’s been a brand new congressional listening to I’m supposed to concentrate to: the Fb hearings, Christine Blasey Ford’s courageous testimony, these new impeachment inquiries. At turns infuriating and galvanizing, these frenzied information cycles all amounted to a variety of sound and fury, signifying nothing however some severe collective trauma.

Zach Dilgard/HBO

Succession has by no means been a collection anybody goes to to for escapism, however the previous couple of episodes particularly have gotten more and more troubling because the present takes on a few of our tradition’s most urgent — and miserable — points. The #MeToo-inspired cruises scandal has been effervescent over all season, bringing out the worst in my favourite characters. There may be no less than a little bit little bit of catharsis that, sure, everybody concerned on this sorts of coverup is simply as monstrous as we thought, however it’s nonetheless not a enjoyable reminder.
Nonetheless, the panic that washes over Logan’s residence is the closest I’ve ever gotten to feeling hopeful whereas watching this present. Heck, the committee listening to that follows is the closest I’ve ever gotten to feeling hopeful whereas watching Congressional testimony. This episode is as excruciating to look at as the remainder of the present, however their acute misery triggers a sort of schadenfreude that I’ve largely been denied whereas watching Succession.
Regardless of (or maybe due to) operating a right-wing information group, the Roys don’t appear to respect the federal government very a lot. Logan pointedly makes the President wait to take his cellphone calls. Roman exclaims, “Fuck Congress,” and appears very happy with himself for doing so. Even Shiv, who labored in politics for years earlier than being promised the household enterprise, appears to view politicians extra as energy brokers than public servants.

Zach Dilgard/HBO

The concept that the Roys might very properly lose management of their firm due to, of all issues, a Congressional listening to does ring of the sort of Shakespearean irony we’ve come to anticipate from this present. I don’t essentially anticipate that to occur — Logan and Shiv particularly have proved that they’re prepared to sink to despicable depths in an effort to maintain onto energy and it’s trying like Tom’s the closest patsy — however the truth that they’re this fearful about it’s nearly refreshing.
Because the penultimate episode of season 2, “DC” largely exists to arrange some finale bombshells. Rhea quits, Roman is held hostage, and Logan requires a “blood sacrifice.” Nevertheless it additionally, for a quick second, allow us to stay in a world the place the individuals who suppose the foundations don’t apply to them may truly face some penalties for that angle.



Supply hyperlink

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *